I:MBristol Revunions, Revs

Bristol Revunions: 'Revs' - Student Sketch Comedy

I:MBristol Revunions, Revs
Bristol Revunions: 'Revs' -  Student Sketch Comedy

****

'Each sketch is supported by hysterical writing and great performances from each actor'

'Even the most naturalistic settings, whether it’s a husband frantically waiting for his wife to come home or an acting audition, are made to feel special by the addition of frankly absurd elements'

For upcoming Sketch Comedy from Bristol Revunions you can like their Facebook Page.
You can also catch them on Tuesday at the White Bear's The Room Above for Glass Half Comedy

 

 

 

Watching the start of ‘Revs’ is something of a holy experience. The cast huddle under dim lighting, as the opening notes of Madonna’s ‘Like a Prayer’ begin, they break away into what can only be described as interpretive dance. The audience sat there enraptured. Half of us in awe of the spectacle, the other part wondering what on earth we’d paid for.

As the catchy chorus kicks in, the cast launches into some hilarious NSYNC-level choreography. Laughter and applause erupted around me, and didn’t stop throughout the whole show.

Directed by Flora Donald, and produced by Ben Gosling, ‘Revs’ is described as Bristol Revunions’ biggest sketch comedy show of the term, and it certainly lives up to that. Although only six actors make up the cast, it never feels that small. James Trickey, Eleanor Harris, Joe Kelly, Jack Butler, Ted Milligan and Issy Phillips effortlessly cycle through such a wide range of eclectic characters and fantastical worlds, that the show’s scope really does feel huge.

In fact, ‘Revs’ is at its best when it completely embraces its absurdist nature. I can’t even begin to imagine how one pitches the idea of a house pretending to be a human, and then getting into an argument with its owner over independence. Yet, in the context of the show, it completely works. Each sketch is supported by hysterical writing and great performances from each actor.

Even the most naturalistic settings, whether it’s a husband frantically waiting for his wife to come home or an acting audition, are made to feel special by the addition of frankly absurd elements.

James Trickey is a notable standout. Every time he comes on stage. Even the most innocuous of lines suddenly becomes hilarious. Trickey’s comedic timing is perfect, adding wit and wonder to every scene he's in. He can play anything from a guilt-ridden Teletubby to a wealthy aristocrat determined to buy Mayfair, and his complete commitment to the roles make it excellent every time.

Comedy is usually described as “funny people doing funny things”, but that’s a poor way to review a show as good as this. The humour of ‘Revs’ was good-natured and genuine, you could tell that the cast and crew had as much fun creating it as the audience did watching it. All in all, another quantifiable hit for Bristol Revunions.
 


****
Naomi Adedokun