I:M

'Some People Talk About Violence', a play exposing how we misunderstand human emotion.

I:M
'Some People Talk About Violence', a play exposing how we misunderstand human emotion.

We have little clue where our lives will take us. Likewise the actors of this play only found out which role they would take once the performance had begun. All the more fitting considering the subject matter.

Some People Talk About Violence forms a sort of aphorism. It creatively explores the inner monologues of a family coping with a depressed daughter. Each of the family of three are isolated from one another. Delving into their frustrations and commitments under unrelenting interrogation from “The Narrator”, whose sole purpose seems to be uncovering the truth of feeling. The effect is real. A dark reflection of our all-too-common inability to understand each other. To understand ourselves.

The plays’ bleak introspection is complemented with an equally black humour. We laugh at uncomfortable yet familiar truths. The pathetic hilarity of being unable to leave the sofa for days. The strangeness of The Imp of the Perverse. Almost playfully we examine the dissonance of our emotions. The inconsistency of who we should like to be, as compared to who we manage to be. All the while there is a subtle sense of building, of bubbling. Of violence. Not explicit. Within.

Whilst experimental theatrics kept the audience alert, they had a tendency to bewilder rather than intrigue. This may have been theatre designed to make you feel rather than think. However at times this idea was taken too far. Otherwise Barrel Organ’s production was impeccable. As were the newly graduated cast. Their chemistry gave the play a spontaneous, unscripted yet confident feel. The Wardrobe Theatre offered a pleasantly intimated venue.

Some People Talk About Violence looks at the personal and interpersonal. Exposes how we misunderstand our own and each others' emotions, despite our deepest compassion for one another. Speaking more broadly, this sort of introspection is ever more important. As we dawn a new era of politics, we all need “The Narrator”.

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Leon Scrase


Barrel Organ's Website