Meet The I:M Artists - KIMI ZOET

Meet The I:M Artists - KIMI ZOET

In anticipation of next week's event, I:M sits down with the 'Reclaim The Night' artists. The night will celebrate work from young female artists inspired by the movement which raises awareness of sexual assault and harassment. It will take place at the Square Club on February 8th. Want to know a bit more before it begins? Have a read of this and find out what Kimi Zoet, one of the artists featured AND I:M's Art's editor, has to say about the methods and stories behind her work. 

SO, WHAT'S YOUR NAME?

Kimi Zoet

AND YOUR DEGREE?

History of Art

WHAT YEAR ARE YOU IN?

Second year

WHAT ARE YOUR INTERESTS? TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF?

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A little bit about myself? Umm.. I love writing kids stories, that’s what I want to do. I’d love to come up with the illustrations and designs. Other than that, I enjoy singing and playing piano. That’s kind of it. That’s kind of me.

WHAT DOES THE THEME ‘RECLAIM THE NIGHT’ MEAN TO YOU?

I don’t think it is specifically to me a gender thing, I think it’s just the notion that we should reclaim the night as a time. This is probably me having my kid story head screwed on but I kind of think it's like when you’re younger and you’re in your bedroom and you’ve got monsters under your bed. You don’t want to get out of your bed because you think if you do the monsters will come out and grab you. That’s kind of what it's like for adults because people do turn into monsters at night because they’re unidentifiable and that is something that the cause is really good at and something we should all work together to change.

HAS THIS INSPIRED YOUR ART?

Yeah, I think it definitely has. I usually do faces, I’ve now gone more towards depicting crowds in darkness. I also think my art has become more intricate, thinking specifically of how I tell little stories within it. It’s kind of the same with kid stories, I don’t think telling stories ever loses its enchantment. The art of it is to always see I guess. 

TELL ME ABOUT YOUR ART?

I only really work with pen and paper now and a bit of acrylic paint. I work in two ways I think. One way is just not taking my pen off the paper, just kind of letting it happen. And the other way I’ve found, the way it usually is that I make a big mistake and all I do is for the next three hours is to try to correct it and then often it looks a lot cooler then it did initially. Like for the three I’ve done for the exhibition I got one of those huge rolly things, one of those things you paint the walls with and I wanted to make four exact squares. I had bought this really expensive paper and one of the first thing that happened was that when I put it on the paper, it just split. My initial reaction was just excitement though. I was then just thinking okay, how can I make this work?

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WHO ARE YOUR INFLUENCES AS AN ARTIST

I was obsessed with Picasso for a very long time. Quite generic but true. Other than that, again a lot of illustrators I really like. I’m bad with names though. And Georgia O’Keeffe, I think she’s amazing. Her work is something that is very far from what my work is but not her as a person. I watched this documentary on her, and I like the way she works with space and colours and it feels very tranquil when you look at her work. Which is just not mine. 

TELL ME ABOUT THE PROCESSES BEHIND YOUR ART?

I usually have no idea what I’m going to do or how it’s going to look. That’s why I find it quite hard to assign work meaning unless as I go I come up with something. Usually I just draw and its like something is unleashed and I never want to stop drawing because I have this idea that one day I want to fill the whole room full of a story that started in one corner. I’ve never done it before but that’s my goal. I think it would be really cool. Like a little man, there’s no particular thing and then he suddenly falls down a well. 

ARE YOU HAPPY WITH YOUR FINISHED PIECES FOR THE EVENT?

Yeah, I like them. I don’t think you can ever fully love something if you’ve made it yourself because you just look at it too many times and it’s yours but, I do like them. I like how they’ve turned out.

DID YOU HAVE ANYONE SPECIFIC IN MIND WHEN CREATING YOUR ART?

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*Laughing* I dont know, any group that has a gallery and wants to display my work. But yeah, no, I don’t really have a particular audience, I hope everyone likes it.

HOW LONG DID IT TAKE TO CREATE YOUR PIECES?

I work really quickly. Takes me like a day to do things. 

IF YOU HAD TO SUMMARISE YOUR ART HOW WOULD YOU EXPLAIN IT?

If I had a summary under my piece? I’ve actually written one…can I send it? *send*

I think of the night as an upside-down world - one that doesn't quite make sense and I aim to communicate this through my work. Through surrealism I am trying to illustrate how the darkness of night distorts peoples surroundings and their behaviour. In this painting I am illustrating the frustrating, endless cycle of day and night, by depicting a persons journey into the night time. You see them climb into the night through a door and hop on a boat to the night city. They then climb their way out of night into the day, only to fall back down into the night time again. I am also illustrating the monsters of the night, relating to a child’s scared and heightened imagination whilst in the dark. This can then be related to an adults fear of ‘monsters’ that only come at night. Night time and day time are physically the same thing, a building is still a building, you remain you - the only thing that has changed is an absence of the light, yet peoples surroundings and behaviour change drastically.

ANY FUTURE AMBITIONS?

I just want to be an artist. That’s just what I really want to do. Hopefully it will work.

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