ReviewI:MReview

Live Review: Franc Moody

ReviewI:MReview
Live Review: Franc Moody

Most bands that aren’t fully ‘established’ give off a slight feeling of childish excitement during their live sets. Even the most talented up-and-coming bands have an air of ‘we can’t believe we’re actually here’. Franc Moody’s October 18th performance at The Exchange was typically commanding, vivacious and full of feeling. Whilst Franc Moody is going from strength to strength, they’re still relative newcomers - until they start playing. Watching them rock out to another sold out venue I felt like I was being schooled in how it should be done, by veterans of the game.

The energy in the room was, unsurprisingly, electric, but the energy was emanating from the band itself. I have never wanted to be up on stage boogieing with a bunch of people so much. The front-men, Ned Franc and Jon Moody, set the tone immediately with the first cosmic notes of ‘Yuri’. Their non-stop movement was mirrored by the audience, not one pair of shoulders wasn’t swaying. They grooved, we moved. It was just impossible not to match the impetus they effortlessly controlled. There wasn’t the common formality of watching performers on stage, however. It seemed everyone was part of the performance and there to enjoy themselves and some real music, Franc Moody included.

It’s such a common need, to compare one artist or band to another in order to categorise their sound. Yet the best thing about Franc Moody is their genre-defying sound. They dish out some serious bass-in-your-face, paired with a whole body groove and some easy synth-pop undertones. Their range of velour tracksuits, vintage shirts and the odd boiler suit lends a certain old school tone to the band which is carried through in their music. While the style of Franc Moody manages to feel retro, the band also strikes a sustained modern, futuristic attitude. They produce a wonderful, unique amalgamation of sound and style, and all that funk is set off by a signature backdrop of blue, purple and pink lights.

When Franc Moody take the stage, it’s clear they’re making music that demands to be heard live. For all the plusses of platforms like Spotify and Tidal, they do have their downfalls. Music that is so accessible, the whole time, means this generation are forgetting the glories of hearing live music. Take a track like ‘Dopamine’ or ‘Dance Moves’, which could be whacked on for some chilled sofa listening, their live performances are trans-formative, from toe-tappers to tail-shakers. This intergalactic, funky bunch are proper musicians, and something tells me they’re just getting started.

Rose Down